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IRS Relief for HDHPs Covering COVID-19 Testing and Treatment Costs

March 12, 2020

Authors

Steve Evans and Serena Yee

IRS Relief for HDHPs Covering COVID-19 Testing and Treatment Costs

March 12, 2020

by: Steve Evans and Serena Yee

Yesterday, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2020-15 announcing that a high deductible health plan’s payment of COVID-19 (coronavirus) testing and treatment prior to satisfaction of the plan’s minimum deductible will not affect its status as a high deductible health plan.

Pursuant to Section 223(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code, high deductible health plans generally must require covered individuals to satisfy minimum deductibles before the plan can pay for any medical care services and items (subject to certain limited exceptions such as preventive care) in order for the covered individuals to remain “eligible individuals” for health savings account (HSA) purposes.   Under the relief provided in Notice 2020-15, this minimum deductible requirement will not apply to:

  • Medical care services and items related to testing for and treatment of COVID-19. These services and items may, therefore, be provided without a deductible or with a deductible that is less than the otherwise applicable minimum deductible.  For 2020, the minimum deductibles are $1,400 for self-only coverage and $2,800 for family coverage.
  • Any COVID-19 vaccine developed in the coming months. The IRS included a reminder that vaccines will continue to be treated as preventive care to which the minimum deductible requirement does not apply.

This is welcome news for employers sponsoring high deductible health plans who have been exploring ways in which to help alleviate the financial obstacles that may prevent employees from getting tested or seeking treatment for COVID-19 as well as for individuals with fully-insured

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HSA Eligibility for Retirement-Age Individuals

June 19, 2018

Authors

Meredith Jacobowitz and Sarah Bhagwandin

HSA Eligibility for Retirement-Age Individuals

June 19, 2018

by: Meredith Jacobowitz and Sarah Bhagwandin

Employers who offer high deductible health insurance plans to their employees typically also offer Health Savings Accounts (“HSAs”). HSAs allow employees to pay for uninsured medical expenses with pre-tax dollars and are set-up under Internal Revenue Code Section 223. HSAs are subject to annual contribution limits—single individuals may contribute up to $3,450 for 2018, families may contribute up to $6,900 for 2018, and individuals over the age of 55 may contribute an extra “catch-up contribution.” In most years, determining an employee’s maximum allowable contribution to an HSA is straightforward—an employee is either covered by a high deductible health plan or not, their spouse or dependent(s) are either covered by a high deductible health plan or not, and the employee is either at least age 55 or younger. However, in the year that an individual turns 65, determining the maximum allowable HSA contribution can become tricky. Read on to learn more about this complicated issue!

Background

HSAs may only be used by “eligible individuals,” as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 223(c)(1). To qualify as an eligible individual, an individual must be enrolled in a high deductible health insurance plan. In addition, to be an “eligible individual,” an individual may not be enrolled in any other health plan, including Medicare. Eligibility to contribute to an HSA is determined on a month-to-month basis, so if an individual enrolls in any other non-high deductible health plan, that individual ceases being an eligible individual for the HSA in that month and for the remaining

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IRS Reduces 2018 Annual HSA Contribution Limit for Family Coverage

March 6, 2018

Authors

Serena Yee

IRS Reduces 2018 Annual HSA Contribution Limit for Family Coverage

March 6, 2018

by: Serena Yee

In May 2017, the IRS issued Rev. Proc. 2017-37 announcing the inflation-adjusted health savings account contribution limits for 2018 as $3,450 for self-only coverage and $6,900 for family coverage.   However, this week the IRS issued Rev. Proc. 2018-18, which supersedes Rev. Proc. 2017-37 and reflects a decrease in the 2018 annual contribution limit for family coverage to $6,850.  Employers that provide a high deductible health plan option to their employees with a health savings account feature should ensure that their communications and systems are updated accordingly.

 

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