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Letters From Your Friends at the IRS About Your Form 5500

Letters From Your Friends at the IRS About Your Form 5500

October 20, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

The IRS Employee Plans Compliance Unit recently announced that they would be sending letters to plan sponsors whose Form 5500 filings were six to nine months late. From our experience, these letters are usually sent because there was a simple error, such as transposed numbers in the employer’s EIN or failing to mark a final return filed in a prior year as the “Final Return/Report.” Most often, a corrected copy of the Form 5500 will suffice to make the IRS go away for this purpose. A failure to respond to a compliance check letter could result in an audit referral to the IRS’s Employee Plans Examinations or the Department of Labor (“DoL”).

If an employer discovers a simple error, such as those noted above, whether via a letter from the IRS or otherwise, we generally recommend that the employer file an amended return with the DoL processing center

Special Action Items for October

Special Action Items for October

October 13, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

This is a brief reminder on common time-sensitive matters. We distribute these by email every month. If you would like to be added to the list, please comment below or email one of us. If you have questions, please call one of us. Thanks very much.

DEADLINES

Only a few days left to comply with these deadlines:

  • October 15, 2011 is the last day that a calendar-year plan can be corrected by amendment and in operation to address failure of the minimum coverage requirements of Code Section 410(b) and the general nondiscrimination requirements of Code Section 401(a)(4) in 2010. Has your plan received these tests from the plan’s recordkeeper?
  • 2011 third-quarter contributions to defined benefit plans must be made by October 15, 2011.
  • Calendar-year defined benefit plans with 100 or more participants are required to submit online premium filings to the PBGC by October 17, 2011. Special rules apply

Third Circuit Update: 401(k) Plan Includes Reasonable Investment Options, Directed Trustee Not A Fiduciary

The Third Circuit recently issued a decision in Renfro v. Unisys Corporation, affirming dismissal of the claims brought against Unisys defendants in a 401(k) plan “excessive fee case.” The court specifically affirmed dismissal of the breach of fiduciary claims brought by of a putative class of participants in a 401(k) defined contribution plan on account of the fact that the Unisys 401(k) plan’s mix and range of investment options was reasonable. Since the court affirmed dismissal of the complaint, it declined to rule on whether the Unisys defendants were entitled to summary judgment on the ERISA Section 404(c) defense. One clear implication of the decision is that there is nothing wrong with offering “higher priced” retail mutual funds in a 401(k) plan. The Third Circuit also affirmed dismissal of the Fidelity defendants since Fidelity was not a fiduciary with respect to the selection and retention of investment options in Unisys’s

What Does Growing Wheat Have to do with Health Reform?

What Does Growing Wheat Have to do with Health Reform?

October 5, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

I get a lot of clients, family members, friends, acquaintances, and random strangers who find out I’m a lawyer asking me what I think is going to happen to the health reform law when the lower court decisions are reviewed by the Supreme Court. Fortunately, unlike the various real estate, estate planning, or tort questions I get asked (mostly by family), this is a subject that I actually know a little about.(1) I am not a Constitutional Law expert, but it was one of my favorite classes in law school.

My personal opinion is that I do not think it or any part of it will be struck down. Others disagree, but they are forgetting that health reform has everything to do with growing wheat.(2)

Back in the 1930’s, FDR kept pushing New Deal reforms through Congress. When the laws were challenged before the Supreme Court, the Supreme Court struck

IRS Establishes a Voluntary Classification Settlement Program

The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) recently announced a new settlement program for employers with misclassified workers. Under the Voluntary Classification Settlement Program (“VCSP”), employers can get a significant reduction in their federal employment tax liability associated with past nonemployment treatment by agreeing to properly classify their workers for future tax periods. This announcement comes on the heels of recent announcements that the IRS, Department of Labor (“DOL”) and various state agencies are collaborating on examining worker misclassification issues.

The VCSP is generally available to employers who want to voluntarily change the prospective classification of their misclassified workers from independent contractors (or other nonemployee status) to employees. To be eligible, the employer must have consistently treated the workers as nonemployees and for the three previous three years filed all required Forms 1099 for such workers. Further, the employer cannot be under audit by the IRS or by the DOL or a

Is Prime + 1% a Reasonable Interest Rate for Qualified Plan Loans?

Is Prime + 1% a Reasonable Interest Rate for Qualified Plan Loans?

September 26, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

In a phone forum held on September 12, 2011, Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) officials were reported by BNA Pension and Benefits Daily in a September 13, 2011 article by Florence Olsen as indicating that the Prime rate + 1% may not be a reasonable interest rate under the Internal Revenue Code prohibited transaction rules which apply to loans from qualified plans. For corrections and audit purposes, the IRS may be looking to the Prime rate + 2%. In recent years, plan administrators typically set the interest rate for plan loans as the Prime rate + 1% in effect on the first of the month during which the loan is originated (or a similar set date). If a participant can not secure a loan in the open market with an interest rate of Prime + 1%, the IRS official indicated that the Prime rate + 2% may be a

IRS Treatment of Employer-Provided Cell Phones and Employer Reimbursement of Personal Cell Phone Use

September 21, 2011

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With the issuance of Notice 2011-72, the Internal Revenue Service finally addressed the uncertainty relating to the tax treatment of employer-provided cell phones (or other similar telecommunications equipment) and of the personal use of an employer-provided cell phone by the employee.

Historically, cell phones provided by an employer to its employees for business use were deductible to the employer and excludable from the employee’s income as a “working condition fringe benefit”, subject to stringent recordkeeping requirements. However, the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 removed the cell phones from the definition of listed property for tax years beginning after December 31, 2009. As a result, employers could arguably exclude the value of certain employer-provided cell phones from employee wages without complying with the substantiation requirements applicable to other employer provided property.

This new guidance offers good news for employers. Pursuant to Notice 2011-72, an employee’s use of an

Getting Ready for Open Enrollment

Getting Ready for Open Enrollment

September 16, 2011

Authored by: Serena Yee

The fall is the time many employers with calendar year group health plans begin to prepare for open enrollment.  Below is a list of required notices that employers should consider including in their enrollment materials.   

  • COBRA Notice.  Plan administrators must provide a written initial COBRA notice to each employee and his or her spouse when group health plan coverage first commences of his or her rights under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (“COBRA”).  This notice must contain specific information, and the Department of Labor has issued a model notice.
  • HIPAA Privacy Notice.  If the group health plan is required to maintain a notice of privacy practices under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”), the notice must be distributed upon an individual’s enrollment in the plan.  Notice of availability to receive another copy must be given every three years.
  • Special Enrollment Rights.  A

2012 PPACA Checklist

2012 PPACA Checklist

September 12, 2011

Authored by: Serena Yee

While most of the design changes required for group health plans under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended (“PPACA”), became effective in 2010 or 2011, some additional requirements must be implemented for 2012.

All group health plans subject to PPACA must comply with the following requirements, regardless of its status as a “grandfathered health plan”:

  • Provision of a Summary of Benefits.  The summary must include the information specified in the regulations but cannot exceed four double-sided pages. A summary must be provided to participants and beneficiaries as part of any written enrollment materials and a summary must be included for each benefit package offered for which the participant or beneficiary is eligible. However, upon renewal, only the summary for the benefit package in which the participant is enrolled needs to be furnished, unless the participant or beneficiary requests a summary for another benefit package. Unless an

New York Marriage Equality and Benefits – Part 2

New York Marriage Equality and Benefits – Part 2

September 8, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

Last week we looked at the implications of New York’s Marriage Equality Act (“Act”) upon the tax treatment of employer-provided health care benefits for same-sex married couples in New York. Today we’ll consider how the Act affects the administration of family and medical leave, HIPAA special enrollment rights and health care continuation coverage under COBRA and New York’s “mini-COBRA” law.

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