Benefits Bryan Cave

Benefits BCLP

Plan Administration and Compliance

Main Content

Does an ERISA Plan Exist?

Does an ERISA Plan Exist?

September 5, 2011

Authored by: Travis Kearbey

This mixed question of fact and law has perplexed courts perhaps as much as it has confused benefits managers in corporations across the nation.  However, for employers operating within the jurisdiction of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals (AR, IA, MO, MN, NE, ND, and SD) this question has recently become easier to answer with respect to single-employee agreements.  In August, the Eighth Circuit parted with federal courts in the Fourth, Seventh, and Eleventh Circuits by holding in Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad Corp. v. Schieffer that a contract governing severance benefits for a single employee does not constitute an ERISA plan.  

New York Marriage Equality and Benefits

New York Marriage Equality and Benefits

September 1, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

Now that same-sex marriage is recognized in New York, what steps do employers need to take with respect to employee benefits? The to-do list must consider the federal Income Tax Code, ERISA, insurance law and of course New York’s Marriage Equality Act (“Act”), which took effect July 24, 2011. This is the first in a series of posts that will discuss this topic.

The Act recognizes all legally performed marriages between same- and opposite-sex couples, whether the marriage took place in New York or elsewhere. This means that same-sex marriages, even those entered into under the laws of another state, must be treated equally under the laws of New York.

COBRA and STD/FMLA

COBRA and STD/FMLA

September 1, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

In Clarcor, Inc. v. Madison Nat’l Life Ins Co. (M.D. Tenn. 2011), the District court for the Middle District of Tennessee upheld a denial of stop-loss coverage by Madison National Life for expenses incurred by an employee who was put on short term disability following FMLA leave.  The employee went on FMLA leave and when that leave expired, she did not return to employment.  Instead, the employer put her on short-term disability. Following the expiration of short-term disability, her employment was terminated and she was offered COBRA.

However, under the eligibility provisions of the self-funded health plan, she was required to be either actively working, on FMLA or on COBRA.  Because she was not in any of those classes, she was ineligible. The employer had a policy providing for continued coverage while employees were on short-term disability, but the policy was not part of the formal plan document.  Therefore, the court said, the policy was not sufficient to establish her eligibility and the stop-loss carrier was correct in denying coverage for her medical expenses.

Individual PTEs Dodd-Frank Act

Individual PTEs Dodd-Frank Act

August 31, 2011

Authored by: benefitsbclp

Earlier this summer, the DOL issued a “FAQ on Credit Ratings and Individual Prohibited Transaction Exemptions”  concerning how Section 939A of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”) will impact prohibited transaction exemptions (“PTEs”) granted to individual fiduciaries or transactions under Section 408(a) of ERISA.  Section 939A of the Dodd-Frank Act generally requires federal agencies to review and modify existing regulations that refer to, or require reliance on, credit ratings within one year following the enactment of Dodd-Frank (i.e., by July 21, 2011).   Certain individual PTEs refer to or rely upon credit ratings.

In its FAQ, the DOL confirmed its position that individual PTEs do not qualify as “federal regulations”; accordingly, Section 939A of the Dodd-Frank Act does not require review and modification of previously granted exemptions. This means that individual PTEs will remain in force with no modifications despite the Section 939A July deadline.

The attorneys of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner make this site available to you only for the educational purposes of imparting general information and a general understanding of the law. This site does not offer specific legal advice. Your use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Bryan Cave LLP or any of its attorneys. Do not use this site as a substitute for specific legal advice from a licensed attorney. Much of the information on this site is based upon preliminary discussions in the absence of definitive advice or policy statements and therefore may change as soon as more definitive advice is available. Please review our full disclaimer.