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The President’s Benefits Budget Proposals

ThinkstockPhotos-122516159A few weeks ago, the President released his proposed budget for the fiscal year 2017. As usual, it is dense. However, the President has suggested some changes to employee benefits that are worth noting. While they are unlikely to get too much traction in an election year, it is useful to keep them in mind as various bills wind their way through Congress to see what the President might support.

  • Auto-IRAs. Stop us if you’ve heard this one before. The proposal would require every employer with more than 10 employees that does not offer a retirement plan to automatically enroll workers in an IRA. No employer contribution would be required and, of course, individuals could choose not to contribute. (In case you’ve forgotten, we’ve seen this before.)
  • Tax Credits for Retirement Plans. Employers

Congress Engages in Some Holiday Spending on Benefits

Congress’s recent $1.8 trillion holiday shopping spree (aka The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, which became law on December 18, 2015) included a few employee benefit packages. We recently unwrapped the packages. Here is what we found.

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1.   Cadillac Tax Delayed. The largest present under the employee benefits tree is a delay in the so-called “Cadillac” tax, which as originally enacted imposed a 40% nondeductible excise tax on insurers and self-funded health plans with respect to the cost of employer-sponsored health benefits exceeding statutory limits. The tax is now scheduled to take effect in 2020 rather than 2018. Once – or if – the delayed tax provision becomes effective, it will be deductible. The cost of this gift is $17.7 billion.

Since the Cadillac tax is basically unadministrable in its current form, we can’t imagine there is even one person at Treasury

Reacting to Our Failure to Effect Sound Retirement Policy

December 11, 2015

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Reacting to Our Failure to Effect Sound Retirement Policy

December 11, 2015

Authored by: benefitsbclp

Puzzle PiecesEver since ERISA was first promulgated, and notwithstanding consequential economic, societal and demographic changes, efforts at improving the nation’s employer-based retirement structure have had fits and starts mostly due to the failure of Congress and the Nation to revisit retirement policy in a meaningful way. A cynic (or maybe a pragmatist) would surely believe that Congress’ part in failing focuses primarily on using the retirement system as a tool to exact revenue for the federal treasury, contrary to policies that enhance tax advantages for retirement saving. The smoke and mirrors of Congressional budgeting lead to intentional ignorance of most of the impact of long-term revenue from the retirement system.(To say nothing of changes to the Social Security system, which is beyond the scope of this piece.)

ERISA was a wonderfully crafted and meaningful

Did They Do It? The Department of Labor “Clearing the Way” for State-Based Retirement Plans

It is not news that Americans aren’t saving enough for retirement. But, what is news, is that this Administration seems to be bent on making some meaningful change on that front with the enactment of one particular solution – state-based retirement plans. After hearing the marching orders of the President to clear the path for state-based retirement savings initiatives (including legislation that automatically enrolls employees in IRAs), the Department of Labor has declared VICTORY!

But let’s take a closer look. What did the Department actually do? And will it withstand public commentary, let alone judicial scrutiny?

Last week, the Department issued two pieces of guidance: an Interpretive Bulletin and a Proposed Regulation. Each attempts to tackle a different element of the state-based IRA arena:

  • ERISA-Covered Plans, But No Preemption?
  • Performing a little fancy footwork, the Department issued an “Interpretive Bulletin” (which is, in effect, an interpretation

    Risk-Shifting and the Demise of the Determination Letter Program

    Risk ShiftingLast week, at the Western Benefits Conference, IRS Commissioner of the Tax Exempt and Government Entities Division, Sunita B. Lough, addressed the conference minutes after the IRS released Ann. 2015-19, 2015-32 IRB.  This is the announcement reforming the determination letter process primarily for individually designed plans.

    Commissioner Lough explained the rationale for elimination of the determination letter process for individually designed plans other than on plan adoption and termination.  She stated that the average time a reviewer takes to determine that a plan is compliant is three hours.  This limited time results from the significant number of applications and the shortage of qualified IRS personnel due to budget limitations.  Based on a three hour review, the IRS has been issuing, in her view, an opinion letter that would take a law firm

    Employee Stock Ownership Plans: Another Tool for Family-Owned Banks

    Today’s economy presents numerous challenges to community bank profitability—compressed net interest margins, increased regulation, and management teams fatigued by the crisis. In response to these obstacles, many boards of directors are exploring new ways to reduce expenses, retain qualified management teams, and offer opportunities for liquidity to current shareholders short of a sale or merger of the institution.

    For many family-owned banks, their deep roots in the community and a desire to see their banks thrive under continued family ownership into future generations can cause these challenges to be felt even more acutely. In particular, recruiting and retaining the “next generation” of management can be difficult. Cash compensation is often not competitive with the compensatory packages offered by publicly-traded institutions, and equity awards for management officials are unattractive given the limited liquidity of the underlying stock. All the while, these institutions should ensure that their owners have reasonable assurances of

    “King” of the Road

    “King” of the Road

    July 6, 2015

    Authored by: Chris Rylands and Lisa Van Fleet

    ACAIn Roger Miller’s 1964 hit by the above name, he tells the tale of “a man of means by no means,” a man just scraping to get by. While he may not have a phone, a pool, pets, or cigarettes (and really, what does he need that last item for anyway?), after the Supreme Court’s 6-3 decision on June 25, however, such a man might be able to secure a premium tax credit to help pay for health insurance (yes, we realize he’d probably be Medicaid eligible, but just work with us here).

    But what does the ruling mean for employers? At first, it might appear that it doesn’t mean very much; life under the Affordable Care Act will continue to move along much as it has for the last few

    After Obergefell, Is it “Get Married Or Else”?

    After Obergefell, Is it “Get Married Or Else”?

    July 1, 2015

    Authored by: Chris Rylands and Denise Erwin

    Gavel and RingsAs has now been widely reported, the Supreme Court ruled on June 26 (the second anniversary of the Windsor decision) that same-sex couples have a right to marry in any part of the United States. Despite being hailed as a victory for marriage equality, as this New York Times article points out, it may not be such happy news for currently unwed domestic partners. Specifically, there is a concern, as the article points out, that employers who previously extended coverage to domestic partners out of a sense of equity may now decide not to since both opposite-sex and same-sex couples can now marry.

    As the article mentions, there was a concern at one time that domestic partnership rules would be used by some employees to cover individuals with whom they

    How to Avoid the “Kitchen Sink” Appeal and Other Nuances for A Self-Insured Health Plan

    For many years, medical plan drafting was viewed as a commodity. Insurance companies, third-party administrators and brokers often prepared summary plan descriptions and plan documents for self-insured medical plans using form documents. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act and other health-care related laws, however, medical claims, appeals and litigation have increased exponentially. In many instances, the terms of the plan documents have been outcome-determinative with respect to these disputes. There never has been a better time for an employer to step back and take a comprehensive review of the terms of the employer’s self-insured medical plan document and summary plan description, not only for compliance reasons but also to put the employer in the best position in the event of any dispute. The following are three drafting tips which might be considered during such a review.

    Kitchen Sink Read More

    Five Years into Health Care Reform – A Quick Look at What’s Still on the Horizon

    Time flies when you’re having fun… or something like that?! Next month will mark the fifth year anniversary of the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act). This is a law of many names including the ACA, PPACA, health care reform, Obamacare (amongst others that we can’t in good conscience commit to writing – especially in a professional publication) and a law of many facets. As we approach the five year mark of living with this law, many questions have been answered (at least in part, right?). After all, numerous reports have recounted the staggering number of pages of guidance issued in connection with the ACA – remember Rep. Richard Hudson’s exaggeration that we have 33,000 pages of guidance and Senator Mitch McConnell’s estimate at 22,000 pages? And both these figures were announced in the first half of

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