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J, K, L, M and N: What’s In a Letter?

Over the last few months, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has been replying to responses to their Letter 226-J, which notifies employers of a proposed Employer Shared Responsibility Payment (ESRP). The IRS has recently updated its website to include additional information on its Letter 227 series. The various letters either close the ESRP case or provide the employer with next steps.

If you responded to a Letter 226-J, the reply from the IRS will come in the form of one of the following four 227 letters:

  • Letter 227-J. If you submitted a completed Form 14764, ESRP Response agreeing to the ESRP amount proposed in your Letter 226-J, the IRS will acknowledge its receipt using Letter 227-J and provide instructions for making the ESRP. If full payment is not received within 10 days, the IRS will issue a Notice and Demand for the outstanding balance.
  • Letter 227-K. You

IRS Reduces 2018 Annual HSA Contribution Limit for Family Coverage

March 6, 2018

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In May 2017, the IRS issued Rev. Proc. 2017-37 announcing the inflation-adjusted health savings account contribution limits for 2018 as $3,450 for self-only coverage and $6,900 for family coverage.   However, this week the IRS issued Rev. Proc. 2018-18, which supersedes Rev. Proc. 2017-37 and reflects a decrease in the 2018 annual contribution limit for family coverage to $6,850.  Employers that provide a high deductible health plan option to their employees with a health savings account feature should ensure that their communications and systems are updated accordingly.

 

Play Time is Over: IRS Reveals Process for Assessing ACA Penalties

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) introduced a “pay or play” scheme, effective January 1, 2015, in which Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) must offer affordable qualifying healthcare to their full-time employees (and their dependent children) or pay a penalty. Despite President Trump’s first Executive Order (discussed here) directing a rollback of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and instructing the Secretary of Health and Human Services to minimize the “unwarranted economic and regulatory burden of the act,” the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) quietly updated its Questions and Answers on Employer Shared Responsibility Provisions Under the ACA to include the first official guidance detailing the process for enforcement of the penalty. Notably, this update coincided with an IRS announcement that penalties for the 2015 calendar

Code Section 409A…Here Today but Possibly Gone Tomorrow and Other Proposed Changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Last week the House unveiled its tax overhaul plan, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“Act”).  The Act’s proposals related to employee benefits and compensation are as follows:

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

Perhaps one of the most talked about aspects of the Act (at least among benefits practitioners) is the demise of Code section 409A and the creation of its replacement, Code section 409B.

Under the proposed Code section 409B regime, nonqualified deferred compensation would be defined broadly to include any compensation that could be paid later than the March 15 following the taxable year in which the compensation is no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture, but with specific carve-outs for qualified retirement plans and bona fide vacation, leave, disability, or death benefit plans.  Stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units, and other phantom equity are included expressly in the definition of nonqualified deferred compensation.

All

Telemedicine – An Expanding Landscape

According to one recent survey, telemedicine services (i.e., remote delivery of healthcare services using telecommunications technology) among large employers (500 or more employees) grew from 18% in 2014 to 59% in 2016.  Common selling points touted by telemedicine vendors include reduced health care costs and employee convenience.  However, state licensure laws imposing restrictions on telemedicine practitioners can often limit the value (or even availability) of telemedicine services to employees.

But that seems to be changing.

Texas Law Change

This summer Texas passed legislation (SB 1107) prohibiting regulatory agencies with authority over a health professional from adopting rules pertaining to telemedicine that would impose a higher standard of care than the in-person standard of care.  With the enactment of SB1107, the Texas Medical Board must revise portions of its existing telemedicine regulations, which had largely been viewed as some of the most restrictive in the country.  Key revisions proposed

Button up Your Business Associates Agreements or Pay the Price

480652321Last month, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a resolution agreement with the Center for Children’s Digestive Health (CCDH) which included a $31,000 penalty.

This isn’t the first time a covered entity has paid a “resolution amount” to settle potential violations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules with respect to a business associate agreement (or lack thereof).

DOL Gives a Peek at Non-quantitative Treatment Limitations

Mental Health ScrabbleWhile on this day, most people focus on the heart, we’re going to spend a little time focusing on the head.  Under the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA), health plans generally cannot impose more stringent “non-quantitative” treatment limitations on mental health and substance abuse benefits (we will use “mental health” for short) than they impose on medical/surgical benefits.  The point of the rule is to prevent plans from imposing standards (pre-approval/precertification or medical necessity, as two examples) that make it harder for participants to get coverage for mental health benefits than medical/surgical benefits. “Non-quantitative” has been synonymous with “undeterminable” and “unmeasurable”,  so to say that this is a “fuzzy” standard is an understatement.

However, we are not without some hints as to the Labor Department’s views on how

ISS Updates Proxy Voting Guidelines for 2017

ISS Updates Proxy Voting Guidelines for 2017

December 9, 2016

Authored by: Serena Yee and Denise Erwin

vote-do-not-useLast month, Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) published updates to its proxy voting guidelines effective for meetings on or after February 1, 2017.  Key compensation-related changes include the following:

Non-Employee Director Compensation Programs

In the case of management proposals seeking shareholder ratification of non-employee director compensation, ISS will review such proposals on a case-by-case basis utilizing the following factors:

  • Amount of director compensation relative to similar companies
  • Existence of problematic pay practices relating to director compensation
  • Director stock ownership guidelines and holding requirements
  • Vesting schedules for equity awards
  • Mix of cash and equity-based compensation
  • Meaningful limits on director compensation
  • Availability of retirement benefits or perquisites
  • Quality of director compensation disclosure

To the extent the equity plan under which non-employee director grants are awarded is on the ballot, ISS will consider whether it warrants

We Received an Exchange Subsidy Notice…Now What?

ACA Blue HighlightThe Affordable Care Act exchanges/marketplaces are required to notify employers of any employees who have been determined eligible for advance payments of the premium tax credit or cost-sharing reductions (i.e., subsidy) and enrolled in a qualified health plan through the exchange.

A few weeks ago the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) began issuing these notices to employers for 2016. If you received such a notice, this means that at the time of applying for health care coverage through the exchange, the employee indicated that:

  • you made no offer of health coverage;
  • you offered health coverage, but it either wasn’t affordable or didn’t offer minimum value; or
  • he or she was unable to enroll in the health coverage due to a waiting period.

Now, receipt

EEOC Takes Aim at Erroneous Application of ADA “Safe Harbor” to Wellness Programs

Challenges AheadIn its preamble to the final regulations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) published May 17, 2016, which will be the topic of an upcoming blog post, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) once again reiterated its disagreement with the district courts’ application of the bona fide plan safe harbor to the wellness programs in Seff v. Broward County and EEOC v. Flambeau, Inc. (discussed in a prior post).

Seff and Flambeau

In both Seff and Flambeau, plaintiffs brought suit arguing that the wellness programs violated the ADA’s prohibition on mandatory medical examinations and inquiries. Both courts disagreed and held that the wellness programs fell under the safe harbor provision, which in pertinent part state that an insurer or any entity that

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