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J, K, L, M and N: What’s In a Letter?

Over the last few months, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has been replying to responses to their Letter 226-J, which notifies employers of a proposed Employer Shared Responsibility Payment (ESRP). The IRS has recently updated its website to include additional information on its Letter 227 series. The various letters either close the ESRP case or provide the employer with next steps.

If you responded to a Letter 226-J, the reply from the IRS will come in the form of one of the following four 227 letters:

  • Letter 227-J. If you submitted a completed Form 14764, ESRP Response agreeing to the ESRP amount proposed in your Letter 226-J, the IRS will acknowledge its receipt using Letter 227-J and provide instructions for making the ESRP. If full payment is not received within 10 days, the IRS will issue a Notice and Demand for the outstanding balance.
  • Letter 227-K. You

HSA Eligibility for Retirement-Age Individuals

Employers who offer high deductible health insurance plans to their employees typically also offer Health Savings Accounts (“HSAs”). HSAs allow employees to pay for uninsured medical expenses with pre-tax dollars and are set-up under Internal Revenue Code Section 223. HSAs are subject to annual contribution limits—single individuals may contribute up to $3,450 for 2018, families may contribute up to $6,900 for 2018, and individuals over the age of 55 may contribute an extra “catch-up contribution.” In most years, determining an employee’s maximum allowable contribution to an HSA is straightforward—an employee is either covered by a high deductible health plan or not, their spouse or dependent(s) are either covered by a high deductible health plan or not, and the employee is either at least age 55 or younger. However, in the year that an individual turns 65, determining the maximum allowable HSA contribution can become tricky. Read on to learn more

Deep Dive: Association Health Plans, Part 2

On October 12, 2017, President Trump signed a “Presidential Executive Order Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States” (the “Executive Order”) to “facilitate the purchase of insurance across State Lines and the development and operation of a healthcare system that provides high-quality care at affordable prices for the American People.” One of the stated goals in the Executive Order is to expand access to and allow more employers to form Association Health Plans (“AHPs”). In furtherance of this goal, the Executive Order directed the Department of Labor to consider proposing new rules to expand the definition of “employer” under Section 3(5) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”). The Department of Labor issued its proposed rule on January 5, 2018.

In Part 1 of this “Deep Dive” series, we started examining the history of AHPs and the effects of the changes proposed by the Trump Administration

Seventh Circuit Holds that ERISA does not Preempt State “Slayer Statute”

We turn once again to the sad and difficult task that plan administrators face when distributing the benefits of a participant who has been murdered by his or her designated beneficiary. Sad for obvious reasons.  Difficult because ERISA and state law may provide different answers.  ERISA directs a plan to honor a participant’s beneficiary designation—meaning that the murderer would receive the benefit. “Slayer statutes” prohibit the murderer from receiving a financial benefit from his or her victim, requiring the plan to disregard the beneficiary designation.

Our prior blog post suggested three strategies that a plan administrator might employ in the face of uncertainty: interpleader, receipt and refunding agreement, and affidavit of status.  Under the interpleader approach, the plan administrator would pay the benefit into the registry of the court and join each potential claimant as a party defendant. Each claimant would then argue for receipt of the

The Good, the Bad, and the Tax-Exempt Organization: The New Tax Bill’s Effect on Benefits and Compensation Offered by Institutions of Higher Education

On December 22, President Trump signed “An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018” (“Bill”) into law. The Bill was previously named the much-shorter “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” but was changed after a senator pointed out that the name violated an obscure Senate rule.

The new employee benefit and executive compensation provisions in the Bill affect both individuals and employers. The good news for colleges and universities is that the harshest employee benefit provisions directed at colleges and universities were not included in the final Bill. The bad news is that the executive compensation and fringe benefit changes directed at tax-exempt organizations are unfavorable to institutions of higher education.

THE GOOD: CHANGES EXCLUDED FROM THE FINAL BILL

The House passed a version of the Bill that would have repealed the exclusion from income for

4 Steps for Compliance with the New Disability Claims Procedures

Did you read our post “Work Now, Party Later,” advising you to do just that in response to the new Department of Labor rule governing disability claims procedures? If so—party on! If not, we hope you enjoyed your holiday celebrations, because it is now time to work.

On January 5, the Department of Labor announced its decision that the new disability claims procedure rules will take effect on April 1 of this year. Here is our suggested plan of attack for employers:

Step 1: Review our previous blog post to familiarize yourself with the new rules.

Step 2: Identify which of your plans offer disability benefits.

Remember to check both your ERISA qualified and nonqualified plans.

Step 3. Determine whether you need to amend your plan and/or SPD.

Under the new rules, participants who file a disability claim must receive an expanded explanation of their adverse

Play Time is Over: IRS Reveals Process for Assessing ACA Penalties

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) introduced a “pay or play” scheme, effective January 1, 2015, in which Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) must offer affordable qualifying healthcare to their full-time employees (and their dependent children) or pay a penalty. Despite President Trump’s first Executive Order (discussed here) directing a rollback of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and instructing the Secretary of Health and Human Services to minimize the “unwarranted economic and regulatory burden of the act,” the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) quietly updated its Questions and Answers on Employer Shared Responsibility Provisions Under the ACA to include the first official guidance detailing the process for enforcement of the penalty. Notably, this update coincided with an IRS announcement that penalties for the 2015 calendar

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