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Supreme Court to Hear Case on Accrual of Causes of Action Under ERISA

Yesterday, the Supreme Court granted a plan participant’s petition for a writ of certiorari in Heimeshoff v. Hartford Life & Acc. Ins. Co., No. 12-729, 2013 WL 1500233 (Apr. 15, 2013). The Court limited its review to a single question raised by the petitioner: “When should a statute of limitations accrue for judicial review of an ERISA disability adverse benefit determination?” The Supreme Court declined review of two other questions raised by the petition regarding the adequacy of notice provided to the participant: (1) “What notice regarding time limits for judicial review of an adverse benefit determination should an ERISA plan or its fiduciary give the claimant with a disability claim?”; and (2) “When an ERISA plan or its fiduciary fails to give proper notice of the time limits for filing a judicial action to review denial of disability benefits, what is the remedy?”

The Second

Eighth Circuit Clarifies the Scope of ERISA’s Application to Severance Arrangements

 The Eighth Circuit’s recent decision in Dakota, Minn. & E. R.R. Corp. v. Schieffer (Schieffer II), No. 12-1807, 2013 WL 1235235 (8th Cir. Mar. 28, 2013), offers new insight into the circumstances under which severance benefits provided under an executive’s employment contract are governed by ERISA.  The opinion clarifies that ERISA does not govern contractual obligations in an executive employment contract that are not provided under an ERISA plan and, even where amount of payments are made by reference to the terms of an ERISA plan, the arrangement does not “relate to” an ERISA plan.   Schieffer concerned a dispute over severance benefits after the employer (“DM&E”) terminated its CEO in anticipation of a merger.  Under the employment agreement, DM&E had agreed to continue providing Schieffer benefits for three years following his severance payment.  These benefits, as described in the employment agreement, included “‘all employee health, welfare and retirement benefits

Eighth Circuit Finds No Abuse of Discretion in Administrator’s Termination of Benefits and Raises Questions Concerning Proper Standard of Review Upon Allegations of “Procedural Irregularities”

 In a decision released July 24, 2012, the Eight Circuit affirmed a lower court judgment that a plan administrator committed no abuse of discretion when it terminated an employee’s long-term disability benefits. The case, styled Wade v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., No. 11-3295 (8th Cir. July 24, 2012), involved a Quest Diagnostics, Inc. employee’s challenge to Aetna’s termination of her benefits despite a previous, contrary decision from the Social Security Administration (SSA), coupled with allegations of “serious procedural irregularities.” 

In its decision, the 8th Circuit began by concluding that the district court had reviewed the termination decision under the correct “abuse-of-discretion” standard. Under ERISA, a court’s review of a plan administrator’s denial of benefits considers whether the benefit plan gives the administrator the discretion to determine eligibility for benefits. Here, the plan unequivocally granted Aetna this discretionary authority. Nevertheless, Wade sought de novo review of Aetna’s termination decision by alleging

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