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Good News! New 409A Regulations (Yes, Really!) – Part 4: Getting Paid

Good NewsOn the TV show Futurama, the aged proprietor of the delivery company Planet Express, Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth, had a habit of entering a room where the other characters were gathered and sharing his trademark line, “Good news, everyone!”  Of course, his news was rarely good.  More often, it was the beginning of some misadventure through which the other characters would inevitably suffer, often to great comedic effect.  So we can forgive you for thinking that we may be standing in his shoes when we tell you that new 409A regulations are good news, but really, hear us (read us?) out.

The IRS released proposed changes to both the existing final regulations and the proposed income inclusion regulations.  And the news is mostly good.  Additionally, taxpayers can rely on the proposed regulations.

The changes are legion, so we are breaking up our coverage into a series of blog posts. This fourth in our series is about payment-related changes.  See our first three posts, “Firing Squad,” “Taking (and Giving) Stock,” and “Don’t Fear the (409A) Reaper.” Check back for one more post on these regulations.

What’s a Payment?  That’s not merely a philosophical question.  The current regulations use “payment” a great many times, but without definition.  The proposed regulations state that a payment, for 409A purposes, is generally made when a taxable benefit

Good News! New 409A Regulations (Yes, Really!) – Part 3: Don’t Fear the (409A) Reaper

Good NewsOn the TV show Futurama, the aged proprietor of the delivery company Planet Express, Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth, had a habit of entering a room where the other characters were gathered and sharing his trademark line, “Good news, everyone!”  Of course, his news was rarely good.  More often, it was the beginning of some misadventure through which the other characters would inevitably suffer, often to great comedic effect.  So we can forgive you for thinking that we may be standing in his shoes when we tell you that new 409A regulations are good news, but really, hear us (read us?) out.

The IRS released proposed changes to both the existing final regulations and the proposed income inclusion regulations.  And the news is mostly good.  Additionally, taxpayers can rely on the proposed regulations.

The changes are legion, so we are breaking up our coverage into a series of blog posts. This third post is about the death benefit changes.  See our first two posts, “Firing Squad” and “Taking (and Giving) Stock.” Check back for future posts on these regulations.

Accelerated Payments for Beneficiaries. 409A generally allows plans to add death, disability, or unforeseeable emergency as potentially earlier alternative payment dates.  However, this special rule only applied to the service provider.  If the service provider dies, then the payment schedule applicable on the service provider’s death

Good News! New 409A Regulations (Yes, Really!) – Part 2: Taking (and Giving) Stock

Good NewsOn the TV show Futurama, the aged proprietor of the delivery company Planet Express, Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth, had a habit of entering a room where the other characters were gathered and sharing his trademark line, “Good news, everyone!”  Of course, his news was rarely good.  More often, it was the beginning of some misadventure through which the other characters would inevitably suffer, often to great comedic effect.  So we can forgive you for thinking that we may be standing in his shoes when we tell you that new 409A regulations are good news, but really, hear us (read us?) out.

The IRS released proposed changes to both the existing final regulations and the proposed income inclusion regulations.  And the news is mostly good.  Additionally, taxpayers can rely on the proposed regulations.

The changes are legion, so we are breaking up our coverage into a series of blog posts. This second post relates to changes in stock awards and stock sales.  See our first post, “Firing Squad.”  Check back for future posts on these regulations.

Discounted Stock Buybacks Are Now Okay, Sort of. The existing regulations had a trap for the unwary.  If the stock subject to an option or stock appreciation right (SAR) was subject to a buyback at other than fair market value, then the option or SAR may not be exempt from 409A. 

Penalty Amounts Get Adjustment (Upward, of Course)

PenaltyThe Department of Labor (DOL), along with several other federal agencies, recently released adjusted penalty amounts for various violations. The amounts had not been adjusted since 2003, so there was some catching up to do, as required by legislation passed late last year.

These new penalty amounts apply to penalties assessed after August 1, 2016 for violations that occurred after November 2, 2015 (which was when the legislation was passed). Therefore, while the penalty amounts aren’t effective yet, they will be very soon and they will apply to violations that may have already occurred.  Additionally, per the legislation, these amounts will be subject to annual adjustment going forward, so they will keep going up.

The DOL released a Fact Sheet with all the updated penalty amounts under ERISA.  A few of the highlights are:

General Penalties

  • For a failure to file a 5500, the penalty will be $2,063 per day (up from $1,100).
  • If you don’t provide documents and information requested by the DOL, the penalty will be $147 per day (up from $110), up to a maximum penalty of $1,472 per request (up from $1,100).
  • A failure to provide reports to certain former participants or failure to maintain records to determine their benefits is now $28 per employee (up from $10).

Pension and Retirement

  • A

Good News! New 409A Regulations (Yes, Really!) – Part 1: Firing Squad

Good NewsOn the TV show Futurama, the aged proprietor of the delivery company Planet Express, Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth, had a habit of entering a room where the other characters were gathered and sharing his trademark line, “Good news, everyone!”  Of course, his news was rarely good.  More often, it was the beginning of some misadventure through which the other characters would inevitably suffer, often to great comedic effect.  So we can forgive you for thinking that we may be standing in his shoes when we tell you that new 409A regulations are good news, but really, hear us (read us?) out.

The IRS released proposed changes to both the existing final regulations and the proposed income inclusion regulations.  And the news is mostly good.

The changes are legion, so we are breaking up our coverage into a series of blog posts. This first post is all about the changes related to the end of the service relationship.  Check back for future posts discussing other aspects of these proposed regulations.

Severance Safe Harbor Available for Bad Hires. Severance is, surprisingly to some, generally considered deferred compensation subject to 409A.  However, severance can be exempt from 409A if the severance is due to a truly involuntary separation under 409A and does not exceed two times the lesser of (1) the employee’s prior annual compensation or (2) the limit on compensation

New IRS Memo Confirms Tax Treatment of Wellness Programs & Incentives

Wellness Word CloudIn a recently released IRS Chief Counsel Memo, the IRS confirmed that wellness incentives are generally taxable. The memo also, indirectly, confirmed the tax treatment of wellness programs more generally.

As to the incentives, the IRS held that a cash payment to employees for participating in a wellness program is taxable to the employees. The memo did not deal with incentives paid to dependents, but we presume those would be taxable to the applicable employee as well.  The IRS did say that certain in-kind fringe benefits (like a tee shirt) might be so de minimis as to be exempt as fringe benefits.  Confirming the IRS’s long-standing position, however, cash does not qualify for this exception and is taxable.

This tax treatment also applies to premium reimbursements if the premiums were paid for on a pre-tax basis through a cafeteria plan. Therefore, if employees who participate in a wellness program receive a premium reimbursement of premiums that were originally paid on a pre-tax basis, those reimbursements would be taxable to the employee.  This is logical since, if an employee was simply allowed to pay less in premiums (as opposed to being reimbursed), the amounts not paid as premiums would increase his or her taxable compensation.  There is no reason to expect that a reimbursement would be treated any differently for tax purposes.  While the memo focused on a

The DOL’s New FMLA Poster – Does It Impact Your FMLA Policy?

The DOL’s New FMLA Poster – Does It Impact Your FMLA Policy?

June 1, 2016

Authored by: Christy Phanthavong and Chris Rylands

By now, you’re likely aware (and if you’re not, you should be) that, in April, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”)issued a new “Employee Rights Under The Family And Medical Leave Act” poster, to replace the prior poster on this subject.

The DOL has made clear that the old poster (revised Feb. 2013) is still sufficient – until further notice – to meet the posting requirement under the FMLA regulations. Thus, you’ve probably already given some thought as to whether and when to proceed with updating your posters.

As you consider this step, however, have you also considered whether the new poster impacts your policy?

The FMLA regulations provide that, if an FMLA-covered employer has any FMLA-eligible employees, and if the employer has a written policy on the subject of leave/benefits, then the employer must ensure that its policy contains the same information that is in the FMLA poster. (The notice requirements are discussed at pp. 12-13 of the helpful new publication from the DOL, “The Employer’s Guide to The Family and Medical Leave Act”.)

Accordingly, now is a good time to review your FMLA policy to ensure that it contains all of the information that is in the new poster. Of course, it is to your benefit to include additional provisions in your policy, such as a prohibition on the misuse of FMLA leave. But at a minimum, all of the information that is in the poster must be included.

Note that “all”

New ACA, et. al. FAQs Cover Items From “Top” to “Bottom”

Question Mark ManOn April 20, the “Big Three” agencies (DOL, Treasury/IRS, and HHS) released another set of FAQs (the 31st, for those of you counting at home). Consistent with earlier FAQs, the new FAQs cover a broad range of items under the Affordable Care Act, Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, and Women’s Health Cancer Rights Act. The authors are admittedly curious about how “Frequently” some of these questions are really asked, but we will deal with all of them in brief form below.

1. Bowel Preparation Medication – For those getting a colonoscopy, there is good news. (No, you still have to go.) But the ACA FAQs now say that medications prescribed by your doctor to get you ready for the procedure should be covered by your plan without cost sharing. Plans that were not already covering these at the first dollar will need to start.

2. Contraceptives – As a reminder, plans are required to cover at least one item or service in all the FDA-approved contraceptive methods. However, the FAQs also hearkened back to earlier FAQs reminding sponsors that they could use medical management techniques to cover some versions of an item (such as a generic drug) without cost sharing while imposing cost sharing on more expensive alternatives (like a brand name drug).

Investment Plus Partnership-in-Fact = Withdrawal Liability

Org ChartPreviously, we wrote about the First Circuit decision that a private equity fund constituted a “trade or business” under ERISA as amended by the Multiemployer Pension Plan Amendments Act (“MPPAA”). That dry description is actually very significant since it would mean that private equity funds and their other portfolio companies could be responsible for withdrawal liability, potentially in the millions of dollars, when a portfolio company withdraws from a multiemployer plan. Based on a recent District Court case in that same dispute, it may be even harder for private equity funds and their portfolio companies to escape liability, which could have implications for those companies and the companies that buy them.

By way of background, multiemployer pension plans are pension plans into which (as the name implies) many employers contribute pursuant to collective bargaining agreements. If a multiemployer plan is underfunded, and an employer withdraws, the plan is allowed to assess liability on that employer pursuant to a formula to help make up the underfunding. As we detailed previously, MPPAA imposes liability on any “trade or business” that is under “common control” with the withdrawing employer. In prior iterations of this case, Sun Capital Partners had alleged that none of the three investing funds (Sun Fund IV, Sun Fund III, and Sun Fund III QP) was a trade or business since each was merely a

The President’s Benefits Budget Proposals

ThinkstockPhotos-122516159A few weeks ago, the President released his proposed budget for the fiscal year 2017. As usual, it is dense. However, the President has suggested some changes to employee benefits that are worth noting. While they are unlikely to get too much traction in an election year, it is useful to keep them in mind as various bills wind their way through Congress to see what the President might support.

  • Auto-IRAs. Stop us if you’ve heard this one before. The proposal would require every employer with more than 10 employees that does not offer a retirement plan to automatically enroll workers in an IRA. No employer contribution would be required and, of course, individuals could choose not to contribute. (In case you’ve forgotten, we’ve seen this before.)
  • Tax Credits for Retirement Plans. Employers with 100 or fewer employees who “offer” an auto-IRA (note the euphemistic phrasing in light of the first proposal) would be eligible for a tax credit up to $4,500. The existing startup credit for new retirement plans would also be tripled. Small employers who have a plan, but add automatic enrollment would also be eligible for a $1,500 tax credit.
  • Change in Eligibility for Part-Timers. The budget would require part-time workers who work 500 hours per year for three consecutive years to be made eligible for a retirement plan.
  • Spending Money to Help Save Money. The President proposes to set
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