Benefits Bryan Cave

Benefits BCLP

Other Posts

Main Content

IRS Expands Determination Letter Program for Mergers of Qualified Plans Following Corporate Transactions

The IRS recently reversed course on the availability of the determination letter program for merged qualified retirement plans – thereby providing new alternatives for integrating qualified retirement plan benefits in the context of corporate transactions.

Merged Plan Relief:  Rev. Proc. 2019-20, released on May 1, 2019, expands the IRS’ determination letter program for individually designed qualified retirement plans (e.g., defined benefit plans or defined contribution plans) that result from a merger of two or more qualified retirement plans following a corporate merger, acquisition or other similar business transaction (a “Merged Plan”).  The newly expanded program will be available beginning September 1, 2019 and continuing on an ongoing basis.

Eligibility:  To be eligible for the determination letter program:

  • The Merged Plan must be a combination of two or more qualified retirement plans maintained by previously unrelated entities (i.e., entities that are not members of the same controlled

There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch…But There are Free Snacks

Something to gnaw on during your lunch hour today (sorry, we couldn’t resist):  the IRS recently released TAM 201903017, which ruled that free employee meals provided by an employer were includible in its employees’ taxable income – and therefore subject to employment taxes.

Section 119(a)(1) of the Code excludes the value of meals provided to an employee by an employer if the meals are furnished on the employer’s business premises “for the convenience of the employer.”  The “convenience” test can be met if the employer has a substantial noncompensatory business reason for providing the free meals, such as that the employee must be available for emergency calls or that there are no nearby alternatives to secure a meal within the employee’s meal period.  Under Section 119(b)(4) of the Code, if more than 50% of an employer’s employees on its premises receive meals that satisfy the “convenience” test,

ISS Updates its U.S. Compensation and Equity Compensation Plan Policies for 2019

In December 2018, Institutional Shareholder Services (“ISS”) published updates to its FAQs for its U.S. Compensation Policies and its policies related to U.S. Equity Compensation Plans with respect to annual meetings occurring on or after February 1, 2019.  While ISS did not make major changes for 2019, reporting companies should be aware of the following key updates.

  • The passing scores for all U.S. Equity Plan Scorecard (“EPSC”) models remain the same as in effect for the 2018 proxy season. However, ISS made the following notable changes and clarifications to EPSC’s scoring model:
    • Full points will be awarded for the change in control (CIC) vesting factor if the plan discloses with specificity the CIC vesting treatment for both time- and performance-based awards. If a plan is silent on CIC vesting treatment or provides for discretionary vesting, then no points will be awarded for

FAQs on the New 162(m) Guidance

FAQs on the New 162(m) Guidance

September 13, 2018

Authored by: Lisa Van Fleet and Adam Braun

We previously blogged about the guidance released by the IRS in Notice 2018-68 (the “Notice”), which addressed some of the changes made to Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code (“Section 162(m)”) in the 2017 tax reform law (the “Act”).  In that post, we focused on the general changes in the definition of covered employee and guidance as to what constitutes a written binding contract eligible for grandfather relief.   In this post, we will address 5 of the most common questions we’ve heard companies ask about the guidance and describe potential next steps.

Q 1:   If a performance based compensation arrangement permits negative discretion to zero, are all payments made pursuant to that arrangement subject to 162(m)’s $1 million deduction limit? 

A:  Most likely, yes.  The Notice clarifies that a compensatory arrangement is not a written binding contract to the extent that any

A New Method to Incentivize Young Workers?

Companies have considered various ways to retain and incentivize their younger, and increasingly mobile, workforce.  A recent PLR offers another option: using a 401(k) plan to provide additional benefits (in the form of a nonelective contribution) to employees who pay down their student debt during the plan year.

On August 17, 2018, the IRS released a private letter ruling (PLR 201833012) in which it ruled that a proposed student loan repayment program included in a 401(k) plan does not violate the contingent benefit rule in Internal Revenue Code Section 401(k)(4)(A) and Treas. Reg. 1.401(k)-1(e)(6).  The requesting company’s 401(k) plan and proposed student loan repayment program included the following features:

  • An employee may elect to contribute eligible compensation to the 401(k) plan as pre-tax or Roth elective deferrals, or after-tax employee contributions.
  • If an employee makes an elective contribution during a payroll period equal to at least
The attorneys of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner make this site available to you only for the educational purposes of imparting general information and a general understanding of the law. This site does not offer specific legal advice. Your use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Bryan Cave LLP or any of its attorneys. Do not use this site as a substitute for specific legal advice from a licensed attorney. Much of the information on this site is based upon preliminary discussions in the absence of definitive advice or policy statements and therefore may change as soon as more definitive advice is available. Please review our full disclaimer.