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Worried About the Fiduciary Rule? Don’t Be…Yet!

March 21, 2017

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Worried About the Fiduciary Rule? Don’t Be…Yet!

March 21, 2017

Authored by: benefitsbclp

Pen Marking Days on a CalendarThe Department of Labor (DOL) released Field Assistance Bulletin 2017-01 on March 10, 2017, which outlines a temporary enforcement policy related to its final fiduciary rule.

Background

On February 3, 2017, President Trump directed the DOL to re-examine the final rule’s impact. As a result, on March 2, 2017, the DOL opened a 15-day comment period (which ended last Friday) on a proposed 60-day delay of the rule’s effective date, from April 10, 2017 to June 9, 2017.

Simultaneously, the DOL opened a 45-day comment period on the substance of the actual rule. This second comment period affords the DOL with an opportunity to review comments before June 9, 2017 (the proposed delayed effective date). At such point, the DOL could allow the final rule to take

IRS Views on Self-Certification of Financial Hardship

IRS Views on Self-Certification of Financial Hardship

March 15, 2017

Authored by: Richard Arenburg and Denise Erwin

DesolationIn today’s virtual world, we suspect most plan sponsors rely upon the self-certification process to document and process 401(k) distributions made on account of financial hardship. The IRS has recently issued examination guidelines for its field agents for their use in determining whether a self-certification process has an adequate documentation procedure.  While these examination guidelines do not establish a rule that plan sponsors must follow, we believe most plan sponsors will want to ensure that their self-certification processes are consistent with these guidelines to minimize the potential for any dispute over the acceptability of its practices in the event of an IRS audit.

The examination guidelines describe three required components for the self-certification process:

(1)        the plan sponsor or TPA must provide a notice to participants containing certain required

What a Difference an “H” Makes

Health Care ReformLate on Monday, House Republicans revealed, in two parts (here and here, with summaries here and here) the American Health Care Act (“AHCA”) that is designed to meet the Republicans’ promise to “repeal and replace” the ACA.  In many respects, the AHCA is less “repeal and replace” and more “retool and repurpose,” but there are some significant changes that could affect employers, if this bill becomes law as-is.  Below is a brief summary of the most important points:

  • Employer Mandate, We Hardly Knew You. The ACA employer play or pay mandate is repealed retroactive to January 1, 2016, so if you didn’t offer coverage to your full-time employees, then this is the equivalent of the Monopoly “Get out of Jail Free” card.
  • OTC Reimbursements

Fiduciary Rule Under Review – Delayed Applicability Date

In a prior post, we covered President Trump’s order directing the Department of Labor to review the new regulation and, as it deems appropriate, to take steps to revise or rescind it.  The Employee Benefits Security Administration (“EBSA”) has taken the first step in response to that order by proposing a 60 day delay in the applicability date. The final rule had an applicability date of April 10, 2017.  Likewise, the prohibited transaction exemptions (“PTEs”) included in the final rule, such as the Best Interest Contract Exemption, had an applicability date of April 10, 2017.

In light of the President’s prior order, EBSA has released the text of a proposed rule, to be published on March 2, 2017, delaying the applicability date of the final rule and the PTEs by 60 days.  EBSA noted that there were only 45 days until the rule and the PTEs became effective

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