Benefits Bryan Cave

Benefits BCLP

ARCHIVE

Main Content

Penalty Amounts Adjusted Again!

Penalty Amounts Adjusted Again!

January 27, 2017

Authored by: benefitsbclp

PenaltyLast week, the Department of Labor (DOL) released adjusted penalty amounts which are effective for penalties assessed on or after January 13, 2017, whose associated violations occurred after November 2, 2015.  You might remember that these penalties were just adjusted effective August 1, 2016 (also for violations which occurred after November 2, 2015); however, the DOL is required by law to release adjusted penalties every year by January 15th, so you shouldn’t be surprised to see these amounts rise again next year.

All of the adjusted penalties are published in the Federal Register, but we’ve listed a few of the updated penalty amounts under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) for you below:

General Penalties

  • For a failure to file a 5500, the penalty will be $2,097 per day (up from $2,063).
  • If you don’t provide documents and information requested by the DOL, the penalty will be $149 per day (up from $147), up to a maximum penalty of $1,496 per request (up from $1,472).
  • A failure to provide reports to certain former participants or failure to maintain records to determine their benefits remained stable at $28 per employee.

Pension and Retirement

  • A failure to provide a blackout notice will be subject to a $133 per day per participant penalty (up

The First ACA Shoe Drops

The First ACA Shoe Drops

January 23, 2017

Authored by: Lisa Van Fleet and Chris Rylands

ACA Blue HighlightOnly hours into the new administration, steps were taken to eliminate, or at the very least minimize the impact of, the Patient Protections and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”).  In his first Executive Order, President Trump affirmed his intent to repeal the ACA and further sought to minimize the economic burden of the ACA.  The order instructs the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the heads of all other executive departments and agencies to,  “take all actions consistent with the law to minimize the unwarranted economic and regulatory burden of the act, and prepare to afford the states more flexibility and control to create a more free and open healthcare market.”

This is not a repeal of the ACA (the President cannot unilaterally do that).  However, what it means is that the agencies responsible for overseeing ACA implementation  (HHS, Treasury, and Labor) are tasked with finding ways to lessen the law’s impact.  That can only be done through future rule making and other guidance.  While we do not have a crystal ball, we expect to see several more sets of FAQs that will mitigate the impact of the law and potentially a suspension of the enforcement of such items as the employer play or pay mandate and the individual mandate.  Whether any of that comes to fruition remains to be seen, but it seems reasonable

Now You Can Be Up to Your QNEC in Forfeitures

Money in basket. Isolated over whiteOn January 18, 2017, the IRS issued proposed regulations allowing amounts held as forfeitures in a 401(k) plan to be used to fund qualified nonelective contributions (QNECs) and qualified matching contributions (QMACs). This sounds really technical (and it is), but it’s also really helpful.  Some plan sponsors of 401(k) plans use additional contributions QNECs and/or QMACs to satisfy nondiscrimination testing.  Before these proposed rules, they could not use forfeitures to fund these contributions because the rules required that QNECs and QMACs be nonforfeitable when made (and also subject to the same distribution restrictions as 401(k) contributions).  If you have money sitting in a forfeiture account, then by definition it was forfeitable when made, so that money couldn’t possibly have been used to fund a QNEC or QMAC.

The proposed regulations provide that amounts used to make these contributions must satisfy the vesting requirements and distribution requirements applicable to 401(k) contributions when they are allocated to participants’ accounts rather than when they are contributed to the plan.  The regulations are only proposed, but the IRS has said taxpayers may rely on them.  If the final regulations turn out to be more restrictive, then those restrictions will only apply after the regulations are finalized.

Going forward, plan sponsors wishing to apply amounts held in forfeiture accounts to fund QNECs and QMACs under the 401(k) plan should

Stop! Drop! …and Roll. Smothering Regulations Before They Ignite.

It has been an eventful 10 days in the courts and in Congress for halting impending regulations and setting the stage to roll-back new rules implemented by the Obama Administration. Employers can expect a repeal of recently passed regulations is on the horizon in the area of benefits regulation.

ACA — 1557 Regulations: Discrimination Based on Gender Identity or Pregnancy Termination

A nationwide injunction prohibiting the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from enforcing nondiscrimination rules promulgated under ACA section 1557 as they relate to discrimination on the basis of gender identity or termination of pregnancy was imposed by a federal judge on December 31, 2016. (Franciscan Alliance, Inc. v. Burwell, N.D. Tex., No. 16-cv-108, 12/31/16)  The plaintiffs argued that section 1557 regulations forced health care professionals and religious-based facilities to provide gender transition services against their medical judgment and religious beliefs.

Regulations under 1557 have been challenged in a number of suits across the country, the most recent being a case filed by a collection of Catholic organizations in North Dakota. (Catholic Benefits Ass’n v. Burwell, D.N.D., No. 3:16-cv-432, filed 12/28/2016) Plaintiffs are arguing that the rules improperly require religious health-care organizations and benefits providers to provide services and insurance coverage relating to certain procedures that are in violation of their religious beliefs.

Since the passage of these regulations, employer-sponsors of health plans have been scrambling to determine if the rules require that they cover gender reassignment, among other things. Generally speaking, most employer-sponsored

Top 10 Employee Benefits New Year’s Resolutions for 2017

new-years-resolutionsIf statistics are any guide, by now a significant number of you have already broken your New Year’s resolutions.  However, there’s still plenty of time to make new ones that you can break, er, keep.  If you sponsor or work with an employee benefit plan (and odds are, if you’re reading this, that you do), then here are some ideas to keep in mind in the upcoming year:

    1. Fiduciary, Know Thyself. It important to know your fiduciaries (or know if you are one). Reviewing plan documents, charters, and delegations, among other possible documents, are key to determining who is an ERISA fiduciary. You should make sure that any individuals who have been designated are still willing and able to serve and, if not, they should be removed. While not as much of an issue for plan sponsors, advisors should also closely review the DOL’s conflict of interest/fiduciary rule to determine if it applies to them.
    2. Look Over Your Service Providers’ Shoulders. Even if you think you have outsourced one or more of your plan responsibilities, you’re still required, under ERISA, to monitor those providers to make sure they are doing their jobs properly. Additionally, if you have not done an RFP in a while for a particular service provider, it may be time to do one.
    3. Resolve to Improve Your Plan Governance. As we have detailed previously, the specter

Germany – Rise of Minimum Wage and New Ceilings for Social Security Contributions

Germany – Rise of Minimum Wage and New Ceilings for Social Security Contributions

January 4, 2017

Authored by: Martin Luederitz and Stefan Skulesch

Rise of Minimum Wage as of January 1st 2017:

As of January 1st 2017 the statutory Minimum Wage in Germany rises from € 8.50 to € 8.84 gross per hour. It is the first increase, since the Minimum Wage Act (Mindestlohngesetz – MiLoG) has put into effect a statutory minimum wage for Germany in 2015. This statutory minimum wage applies – with some exceptions – to all employees working on German territory. Most interim arrangements that allowed for lower wages for certain groups of workers expired on 31st of December 2016. As the Minimum Wage Act only states a base amount to be paid for any employee in Germany, binding collective bargaining agreements (Allgemeinverbindliche Tarifverträge) stipulate higher hourly wages in many work areas.

Clients employing blue collar workers in Germany with low salaries as well as clients who have marginal employed employees (geringfügig Beschäftigte) are advised to check whether they comply with the new Minimum Wage.

New contribution assessment ceilings for statutory Social Security as of January 1st 2017:

In Germany, most social benefits such as health insurance, long-term care insurance, pension insurance as well as unemployment insurance are statutory and compulsory for the absolute majority of employees. These programs are generally financed by employers and employees jointly. The contributions employers and employees have to pay are determined by percentage rates applying to the gross salary of the employee. The contribution assessment ceilings (the maximum amount of monthly income to which the contribution rates apply) are subject to periodic changes. As of

The attorneys of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner make this site available to you only for the educational purposes of imparting general information and a general understanding of the law. This site does not offer specific legal advice. Your use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Bryan Cave LLP or any of its attorneys. Do not use this site as a substitute for specific legal advice from a licensed attorney. Much of the information on this site is based upon preliminary discussions in the absence of definitive advice or policy statements and therefore may change as soon as more definitive advice is available. Please review our full disclaimer.