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Kübler-Ross and IRS Announcement 2016-32

griefWhen the IRS announced that it would virtually eliminate the determination letter program for individually designed retirement plans, many practitioners moved through the classic Kübler-Ross five stages of grief (see the picture at the right).  Some have yet to finish.  In Announcement 2016-32, the IRS requested comments on how these plans can maintain compliance going forward since determination letters are no longer available.

As a general rule, the IRS used to deny plans the ability to incorporate tax code provisions by reference (rather than reciting them wholesale in the plan), except for a very short list available here.  The IRS is asking if there are additional provisions that would also be appropriate to incorporate by reference.  This would avoid the need to reproduce these provisions wholesale and run the risk of

I Know My Rollover is Late, but It’s Okay. Trust Me.

certified-with-ink-padAs retirement plan professionals know, certain distributions from plans and IRAs to taxpayers can be rolled over to another plan or IRA within 60 days. Of course, sometimes 60 days is just not enough and the IRS recognizes that, having permitted a seemingly innumerable number of private letter rulings granting extensions.  These often occur where a financial advisor gave bad advice or made some kind of mistake or where some tragedy worthy of a blues or country song (or worse) befell the taxpayer that made it impossible to complete the rollover in 60 days.

The IRS has had a small cottage industry the last decade or so of granting private letter rulings extending the 60-day period for these rollovers.  But now, they’ve decided to let plans and IRAs just take the taxpayer’s word

IRS Addresses ACA Reporting Requirements Self-Funded Plans, HRAs

Regulations and RulesAs promised in Notice 2015-68, the IRS has proposed clarifications to the regulations under IRC Section 6055 relating to information reporting rules for minimal essential coverage providers.  These rules affect employers sponsoring self-funded health plans or self-funded health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) that coordinate with insured plans.  These proposed regulations also address how employers and others solicit taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) to facilitate this reporting.  These rules only impact employers and others who report on the B-series forms (1094-B and 1095-B).  They do not change the reporting or solicitation rules for the C-series forms (1094-C and 1095-C).

Reporting Requirements for Employers Providing Multiple Types of Health Coverage

Information reporting is generally required of every person who provides minimum essential health coverage to an individual. However, in some cases, this reporting

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